I CAN READ GIGANTIC WORDS!

I CAN READ GIGANTIC WORDS!
I CAN READ GIGANTIC WORDS!

VIDEOS

VIDEOS
VIDEOS

MY RESOURCES

MY RESOURCES
MY RESOURCES
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DECODING SUPPORT FOR OLDER READERS AVAILABLE NOW





DECODING SUPPORT FOR OLDER READERS 

AVAILABLE NOW


INTRODUCTION:

TEACH YOUR STUDENTS HOW TO DECODE MULTISYLLABIC WORDS

RESOURCES:

"I Can Read GIGANTIC Words" RESOURCES HERE


THERE ARE SOME CRAZY WORDS IN ENGLISH!

"THE HERESY OF ADVANCED PHONICS"


Some struggling intermediate-grade readers have difficulty believing us when we try to teach them advanced phonics rules. They learned the basic rules of one-to-one sound-symbol correspondence long ago.  They learned those rules easily, in the beginning, and now they're fiercely loyal to that learning. For these students, those rules are absolute.  They are unable to adjust to new, contradictory rules which give four sounds for the letter y (with a reasonable pattern for guessing which one to use) or the suffix “cious” (shus), which, by their rules, should be something like kih-ah-us.  

For many years I thought these students found it difficult to memorize more advanced rules.  I thought the problem was their capacity for memorization.  Memorization was the focus of my mostly futile efforts.  

MAKING SENSE OF COMPLEX SENTENCE STRUCTURES and UNUSUAL USES OF EVERYDAY VOCABULARY

“Sailing Through Sentences”




A crucial area of reading skill - one that trips up many intermediate readers - is the complex sentence structures that they begin to encounter in fourth, fifth and sixth-grade level books.  Many intermediate readers have mastered decoding, yet still experience difficulty reading.  These inexperienced readers have trouble moving from reading simple sentence construction that uses plain vocabulary to more complex sentence structures that employ more complex vocabulary.

My struggling students get caught on vocabulary usages like these: 

“Louie, gun in hand, came sailing through, his drawn pistol in his hand.” (Chocolate Fever, by Robert Kimmel Smith - page 77.) 

COMPREHENSION STRUGGLES: USING PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

"Whirligigs in the Back Yard"


Some students struggle to utilize their own prior knowledge.

We know that readers need schema - life experiences - in order to understand what they read. At first I thought my job would be to make sure my students had life experiences they could bring to their reading. I believed that my readers who struggled with comprehension simply lacked those life experiences.

SETTING GOALS: KEEPING EYES ON THE PRIZE


When teaching struggling upper grade readers, having grade-level goals in mind at all times helps keep progress on track. 

It’s important to set our sights on success.   It’s essential to be convinced each child can and will read at grade level - soon.   Keeping our eyes on the prize is key.    

THE SECRET IN THE STRUGGLING READER


I always wanted to be Trixie Belden or Nancy Drew.  When I was a kid, my best friend Cheri and I spent hours reading detective stories.  Our favorites were Trixie Belden by Julie Campbell and Katheryn Kenny and Nancy Drew by Carolyn Keene. We scoured our suburban backyards and the nearby woods for mysteries.  

Mysteries just appeared to Trixie and her brothers, Mart and Brian, and their friends Honey, Di and Jim at Crabapple Farm and the Manor House near the Hudson River town of Sleepyside.  Nancy Drew and friends, George and Bess and boyfriend, Ned, found mysteries abundant in their New York town of River Heights and pursued them in Nancy’s roadster.  



Trixie and Nancy tackled their mysteries with moxie, keen minds, and, as Nancy Drew’s narrator describes, “warm sympathy for those in trouble.”

JOINING THE CLUB: THE POWER OF READING



When I was a little girl, my parents and grandparents spelled things over our heads. 
  
For a long, frustrating time I wanted desperately to know what they were saying.  I knew they had a power to communicate that I didn’t have.  I also knew that they spelled when something was really important, when it was something on which they did not want our opinions.  Things like bedtime, dessert, a new toy.

DOES EVERYONE NEED TO READ?


“…I believe that books can save lives.  It’s as simple as that.”

-Michael Cart, “Books Make Life Easier” 

A teacher friend once asked me if I believe everyone needs to read.  He’d known people who didn’t or couldn’t read, yet had led extraordinary lives and contributed to the world.  

I understood his question, and I agree with him. Reading is only one of many skills we want people to have.  Reading isn’t what makes a woman or man. The question has stayed with me.  

If I agree with my colleague, why do I work so hard to entice all kids to learn to love to read?  What is it that I believe books can do for kids?  

I CAN READ GIGANTIC WORDS!






I want to introduce you to I Can Read Gigantic Words! - an advanced decoding strategy that really works!

This method for decoding multisyllabic words is especially useful for older readers who are progressing in their reading development. They're encountering longer, more complex reading passages and, let’s face it - GIGANTIC words! 

The basic concept is simple.  Readers learn to 
recognize and know how to pronounce the recurring word parts that make up multisyllabic words in the English language. 

WELCOME!




Welcome to Reading by Heart! I’m Laura Hurley, a reading specialist with decades of experience turning struggling readers into successful readers.

I’ve created this blog to share tips and tricks, strategies and resources that will be of help to older readers - from second graders to adult learners.

Together, we will be exploring advanced decoding support, how to read nonfiction, strengthening stamina, and building confidence.

Join me.  There is good news.  Struggling readers can become successful readers!


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